Home » Artenschutzprogramm Fur Die Gekielte Smaragdlibelle (Oxygastra Curtisii, Insecta: Odonata) in Deutschland: Das Beispiel Der Population an Der Our. by J. Ott
Artenschutzprogramm Fur Die Gekielte Smaragdlibelle (Oxygastra Curtisii, Insecta: Odonata) in Deutschland: Das Beispiel Der Population an Der Our. J. Ott

Artenschutzprogramm Fur Die Gekielte Smaragdlibelle (Oxygastra Curtisii, Insecta: Odonata) in Deutschland: Das Beispiel Der Population an Der Our.

J. Ott

Published in Honor of Professor Newton E. Mortons 70th Birthday class=bookCoverImage itemprop=image src=http://i.gr-assets.com/images/S/photo.goodreads.com/books/1266911107l/4730070._UY115_.jpg title=Recent Advances in Genetic Epidemiology
ISBN : 9781281431899
ebook
130 pages
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 About the Book 

The series Invertebrate Ecology and Conservation Monographs is launched by Pensoft Publishers on behalf of a wide team of specialists from all around the world. It is published in 4 issues per year. The first two volumes appeared in January 2007. TheMoreThe series Invertebrate Ecology and Conservation Monographs is launched by Pensoft Publishers on behalf of a wide team of specialists from all around the world. It is published in 4 issues per year. The first two volumes appeared in January 2007. The main aim of the series is to attract the attention of both academics and society to model studies in invertebrate ecology and conservation. It is also intended to include in-depth studies supported by detailed data, which nowadays are rarely published as complete works because of their volume, but which are often much more sustainable than many high impact journal papers. The present volume 3 focuses on the Orange-spotted emerald Oxygastra curtisii - a slender, medium sized dragonfly with bright green eyes. The species was first described from Britain in 1834, but has become extinct in that country. Subsequently, the species was found in Germany between 1940 and 1943 on the river Sieg in Northrhine-Westfalia, and from where it later disappeared as a consequence of habitat destruction. It was then not seen in Germany for decades and as a consequence the species was classified on the national red lists as extinct. However, in 1999, it was discovered by chance at the river Our, which forms the border between Germany and Luxembourg. As the species is listed in the Annexes II and IV of the EC Habitats Directive (92/43/EWG), this newly-discovered population immediately received special attention by odonatologists and nature conservationists. In addition, the governmental agencies were obliged to take special action to protect this population. The nearest populations are on the river Ourthe in Belgium, and at the river Meuse in France. In 2005 and 2006, a species protection programme for the river Our population of Oxygastra curtisii was begun, on behalf of the Landesamt fur Umwelt, Wasserwirtschaft und Gewerbeaufsicht (LUWG) (Federal Agency for Environmental Protection, Water Resources, Factory Safety and Health Control). The protection measures put in place are an excellent example of targeted species conservation that is supported by detailed studies on ecology, bionomics and habitat preferences. The book is for conservationists, limnologists, landscape ecologists, landscape planners, as well as all dragonfly lovers.