Home » Mil Aircraft: Mil Mi-24, Mil Mi-8, Mil Mi-17, Mil Mi-26, Mil Mi-28, Mil MI-6, Mil V-12, Mil Mi-4, Mil Mi-14, Mil Mi-34, Mil Mi-10, M by Source Wikipedia
Mil Aircraft: Mil Mi-24, Mil Mi-8, Mil Mi-17, Mil Mi-26, Mil Mi-28, Mil MI-6, Mil V-12, Mil Mi-4, Mil Mi-14, Mil Mi-34, Mil Mi-10, M Source Wikipedia

Mil Aircraft: Mil Mi-24, Mil Mi-8, Mil Mi-17, Mil Mi-26, Mil Mi-28, Mil MI-6, Mil V-12, Mil Mi-4, Mil Mi-14, Mil Mi-34, Mil Mi-10, M

Source Wikipedia

Published August 16th 2011
ISBN : 9781155859750
Paperback
44 pages
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 About the Book 

Please note that the content of this book primarily consists of articles available from Wikipedia or other free sources online. Pages: 42. Chapters: Mil Mi-24, Mil Mi-8, Mil Mi-17, Mil Mi-26, Mil Mi-28, Mil Mi-6, Mil V-12, Mil Mi-4, Mil Mi-14, MilMorePlease note that the content of this book primarily consists of articles available from Wikipedia or other free sources online. Pages: 42. Chapters: Mil Mi-24, Mil Mi-8, Mil Mi-17, Mil Mi-26, Mil Mi-28, Mil Mi-6, Mil V-12, Mil Mi-4, Mil Mi-14, Mil Mi-34, Mil Mi-10, Mil Mi-38, Mil Mi-36, Mil Mi-X1, Mil Mi-42, Mil Mi-20, Mil Mi-44, Mil Mi-22, Mil Mi-40, Mil V-7, Mil Mi-30, Mil Mi-54, Mil Mi-58, Mil Mi-32, Mil Mi-52, Mil Mi-46, Mil Mi-60, Mil V-16, Mil V-5. Excerpt: The Mil Mi-24 (Russian: , NATO reporting name: Hind) is a large helicopter gunship (and attack helicopter) and low-capacity troop transport (with room for 8 passengers) produced by Mil Moscow Helicopter Plant and operated from 1972 by the Soviet Air Force, its successors, and over thirty other nations. In October 2007, the Russian Air Force announced it would replace its 250 Mi-24 helicopter gunships with 300 more modern Mi-28s and possibly Ka-50s by 2015. In NATO circles the export versions, Mi-25 and Mi-35, are simply denoted with a letter suffix as Hind D and Hind E respectively. Soviet pilots called the aircraft (letayushchiy tank, flying tank). More common unofficial nicknames were (Krokodil, Crocodile), due to the helicopters new camouflage scheme and (Stakan, Glass), because of the flat glass plates which surround the three place cockpit of the Mi-24A. During the early 1960s, it became apparent to Soviet designer Mikhail Leontyevich Mil that the trend towards ever-increasing battlefield mobility would result in the creation of flying infantry fighting vehicles, which could be used to perform both fire support and infantry transport missions. The first expression of this concept was a mock-up unveiled in 1966 in the experimental shop of the Ministry of Aircrafts factory number 329 where Mil was head designer. The mock-up designated V-24 was based on another project, the V-22 utility helicopter, which itself never flew. The V-24 was similar in layout and c...